PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT ANALYSIS.

Downtown and Crescent (bowl): Nanaimo BC.

Pedestrian
analysis.

Downtown
culture park.

Policy.

Public
urban space.

Building
typology.

NCPVA.
Foundry restored.

This analysis demonstrates topography governs pedestrian movement. Harbour Park Mall's catchment, potentially augmented by residential accommodation above storefronts, is independent of a crescent catchment.

If indeed it is desirable to max-out this area, and this essay makes the point, a retail food complex, at the Gateway Heritage node, together with support retail will be come a necessity.

The relationship between downtown and crescent has been lessened with the introduction of the Gateway Heritage Center. Pedestrian circulation in the downtown culture park becomes a matter of creating public urban space and appropriate connections for events. Pedestrian circulation in the crescent becomes a matter of amenity and convenient connections to the center.

Downtown and crescent potential pedestrian movement.

A: Vivo Gallery Residences to Gateway Heritage Center - 03 minutes walking.
B: Bowen to Gateway Heritage Center along Prideaux Boulevard - 09 minutes walking.
C: VICC to NCPVA along Commercial / Front Parade - 08 minutes walking. An obvious parade route.
D: Vivo to Harbour Park Mall - 09 minutes walking.
E: Hecate Close to Gateway Heritage Center along Selby Boulevard - 06 minutes walking.
F: Gateway Heritage Center across Bastion Bridge to Urban Culture Center - 05 minutes walking
G: Swy-A-Lana Lagoon to Cameron Island pier head, seawall leisure walk.
H: South end of Hecate to Gateway Heritage Center - 09 minutes walking.
I: Mount Benson View Gardens, Pavilion Close to Pioneer Waterfront Plaza - 04 minutes walking.

Steep grade rise from Harbour Park Mall, elevation above sea-level 12 m, east / west to Gateway Heritage Center, elevation above sea-level 39.2 m.
Grade from Pioneer Waterfront Plaza 12 m. to Pavilion Close 22 m .
Crescent (bowl) grade north / south / north essentially level.

This methodology determines the efficacy of a crescent population independent of downtown commercial and the very strong attraction of the north end malls.

Downtown and Crescent: pedestrian analysis.
Scoring from top 10 to 0.

Value

Gradient to center

Distance to center

Walking time to center

Winter walking
Summer walking

Seniors
Empty nesters
Family
School age
Social housing
Commuters

Public transit

Ambience

Score

A

10

09

09

08
10

08
07
07
07
05
-

-

09

89

B

09

04

06

08
10

06
06
06
07
04
02

-

09

71

C

-

-

-

08
08

02
04
-
-
06
02

08

10

48

D

01

03

03

04
05

06
06
01
01
-
06

08

06

50

E

10

08

08

08
10

06
06
03
03
06
02

-

09

79

F

01

07

09

04
08

-
-
03
02
-
-

08

06

48

G

-

-

-

07
10

08
08
-
-
-
08

-

10

51

H

06

03

02

05
07

08
08
08
08
08
04

01

06

74

I

-

-

-

08
10

08
06
09
02
-
-

-

09

52

A subjective assessment.
Grade slopes up-ward east - west with the maximum gradient between Wallace and Wesley: recurring between Milton and Pine. North - south grades vary and not onerous.
Mild winters: few days of snow January - February. Summer rains: June - July ideal for walking.
Cohort, seniors - commuters etc., describes tentative population mix.
Ambience is urban residential, anticipating restoration of side-walks streets and parks
Analysis conclusions: (1) There is no correlation between the crescent and the urban culture park, and (2) As people move in a need arises for the Gateway Heritage Center.
Scoring is empirical: neither arbitrary or scientific.

You can bet, once people get into their cars they'll be off to The Great Canadian SuperStore up north. Even the most ardent proponent of pedestrianization seldom practice what they preach. So unless we make a super-friendly pedestrian environment in the crescent its cars . . . cars . . . cars as for as the eye can see: until gas prices spiral outta sight.

The governing factor limiting pedestrian, or indeed all non-motorized, movement is the convenience of the car especially were steep grades are concerned. Bicycle traversing steep terrain is just as discouraging. Public transit would have to be increased significantly: even then experience shows people will only leave their cars at home when they have to or for recreational walking.

Maxing-out the crescent could result in a population of some ten or twelve thousand, in which case an argument for the Gateway Heritage Food Market can be made.

Connecting downtown to its catchment over Terminal ravine, therefore, becomes redundant. Certainly the walking distances in the crescent are not onerous. And if and when a grocery delivery services is established an ambulatory environment seems plausible!

Note: timing was carried out by a very fit older man accustomed to walking. Obviously times would vary according to the individual. The above, nevertheless, makes the point!

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